Tag Archives: vegan

Vegan Cherry Crumble


Don’t you love summer fruits?  There are so many delicious, colorful, nutritious options to choose from!  We are especially enjoying the CHERRIES!!!  We recently posted one recipe using cherries – black forest bars.  But we didn’t stop there!!!  If you have a sweet tooth, you’ll love these crumbly squares!

Download the print-friendly version here.

Makes:  12 bars
Ingredients:
For the filling:
2 cups cherries, pitted and chopped
2 ½ tablespoons sugar
1 ½ tablespoons cornstarch
½ tablespoon lemon juice
⅛ teaspoon vanilla

For the crumble:
1 cup flour
1 cup oats
⅔ cup brown sugar
¼ cup ground flaxseed
⅛ teaspoon baking soda
½ cup canola oil

Instructions:
Make the filling:
1.  Mix the cherries, sugar, and cornstarch.  Let sit for 15 minutes.
2.  Add the lemon juice and vanilla.
3.  Heat over low heat for about 5 minutes until thick.  Remove from heat and set aside.


Make the crumble:
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (180 degrees C or gas mark 4).
4.  In a bowl, mix flour, oats, brown sugar, ground flaxseed and baking soda.
5.  Add the oil and mix until thoroughly combined.

6.  In a 8 x 8 – inch pan (20 x 20 cm), firmly press half the flour mixture, making a base for the crumble.
7.  Bake for 20 minutes.
8.  Spread the filling on the cooked base and press the other half of the flour mixture to make the top.

9.  Bake for another 20 minutes.
10.  Cool completely.
11. Cut into bars and serve.
Nutrition Information: (for 1 of 12 bars)
258 Calories; 11 g Fat; 0 mg Cholesterol; 37 g Carbohydrates; 3 g Fiber; 4 g Protein

Inspired by recipes from The Joy of Vegan Baking and Color Me Vegan, both by Colleen Patrick-Goudreau.

How do you like to eat YOUR bowl of cherries?
Alf Hana!!!
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Why vegan? For the environment


We’ve been sharing lots of vegan recipes, resources and information over these last few months. Recently, we’ve been asked more and more about why we are vegan. As we wrote in Why Vegan?: For your health, there are many reasons to become vegan. In fact, it is probably not just one reason that causes someone to move toward veganism. For more about the health impacts of veganism, read our first article in this series.

Our topic for today is veganism and its impact on the environment.

When you stop eating meat, you save tons of water, reduce carbon emissions, and reduce soil erosion. The business of raising animals and making them ready for consumption uses a tremendous amount of energy and creates even more waste. Here are a couple of statistics about your diet and the environment.

Water
National Geographic interactive tool: helps identify and compare how your diet impacts water consumption. You can scan through different products and find out how much water is needed to produce each.

Just one for you to consider:
1 pound of beef (or about ½ a kilogram) requires 1,799 gallons (6,810 liters) of water while 1 pound of soybeans (or about ½ a kilogram) requires 216 gallons (818 liters) of water

Melanie Joy, PhD, has also written about the negative effects of a diet based on animals on the Earth’s water.  She writes “Animal agriculture is likely the world’s largest source of water pollution.  The main sources of the pollution are from antibiotics and hormones, chemicals from tanneries, animal wastes, sediments from eroded pastures, and fertilizers and pesticides used for feed crops.”

Carbon emissions
The business of raising animals for food has been found to produce more carbon emissions that all the world’s forms of transportation added together (according to a 2006 report by the United Nations).  Also, another report from the University of Chicago has startling information to share.  Because it takes 7 kilograms of feed to raise 1 kilogram of beef, and the methane released by the animals through their bodily gases, the meat-eater, on average, is responsible for the release of 1.5 more tonnes of carbon a year than a vegan.  Put another way, many sources place the methane produced by cattle and their physical waste can have a polluting effect equal to that of 33 million cars!!!

Erosion

Erosion: courtesy of Soil Science

Erosion is the process by which the fertile soil, and the nutrients therein, are worn away.  Erosion is especially damaging to the Earth.  According to several studies, the process of growing animals for food is responsible for 55 percent of all the erosion now occurring in the United States.  If we would stop growing animals for food, we could greatly reduce the amount of erosion of fertile topsoil.

Choosing more plant-based options in your diet will help you make less of an impact on the Earth.

But the reasons to include more plant-based foods in your diet don’t end here.  Keep an eye out for more posts about reasons to try a more plant-based diet.

Source:
Joy, M. (2010). Why we love dogs, eat pigs, and wear cows. San Francisco: Conari Press.

Tuesday Teaser #8: A German-Inspired Vegan Treat


Recently we traveled to Germany for a short vacation.  While we were there, we discovered a number of delicious completely vegan and vegan-friendly restaurants.

For example, here is a meal we had a Culux, a famous traditional wurst (sausage) restaurant.

As you can see, it was a tofu-based sausage with sauerkraut, salad and curry sauce.  We also had a delicious potato salad on the side (that I neglected to photograph! 😦 )

Anyway, we decided  to try to recreate this tasty meal here in Egypt.  By chance, we found canned sauerkraut at Royal House!!!  And, of course, we have our soy sausages from AHEF.  All that was left was the salad (EASY!) and the potato salad.  Well, after a quick search, we found a recipe for traditional German potato salad at VegWeb.  In fact, the author claims that this recipe is originally from Bavaria, which is where we visited!  Find the original recipe here or use or adapted version below:

Ingredients: (Serves around 10)

  • 1 kilo potatoes
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 vegetable bullion cube
  • 4 tablespoons white vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • pinch of sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon salt or to taste
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 finely chopped onion
  • 1 thinly sliced peeled cucumber

Directions:

  • 1. Boil the potatoes for 30 minutes and then rinse under cold water and drain.
  • 2.  Once the potatoes have cooled, peel them.
  • 3.  Gently chop.
  • 4.  Put into a big salad bowl.
  • 5.  In another bowl, whisk together your bouillon, garlic, vinegar, mustard, vegan sugar, pepper, salt, oil and chopped onion, and then carefully stir into the potatoes.
  • 6.  Gently stir in the cucumber and then refrigerate overnight.

Nutritional information: (1 of 10 servings)

127 Calories; 3 g Fat; 0 mg Cholesterol; 23 g Carbohydrates; 2 g Fiber; 2 g Protein

So here’s our German-inspired Vegan Treats!:

What ethnic foods do you like?  Have you tried to make any vegan versions of them?

Alf Hana!!!

Tuesday Teaser #7: Cornbread


It’s Tuesday and that means it’s time to share another recipe we’ve tried and loved!

If you heat spicy soups this bread is the perfect accompaniment!  Actually, we like to have this bread any time!  I especially like to add the optional whole kernels.  They add such a flare to the texture.

It’s not hard to make this bread and both coarse or fine polenta (cornmeal) will work fine!  Find the recipe here (you’ll have to scroll down – it’s not the first one on the list).  And trust us – this cookbook, The Joy of Vegan Baking, by Colleen Patrick-Goudreau, is THE best plant-based dessert cookbooks we have ever tried!

It pairs wonderfully with our chili….

Do you like sweet breads?  What’s your favorite flavor?

Alf Hana!!!

Tuesday Teaser #6: “Boatmeal” (Baked Oatmeal)


I know it’s summer and hot, but this recipe is just too good to avoid sharing!

We frequently want to have a more heavy, satisfying breakfast, especially on the weekends!  This recipe is just perfect for that!!!! It’s easy, requires very few ingredients, can be easily adjusted to suit your favorite flavors – and is full of whole foods!!! Good for your heart, start your day with walnut raisin boatmeal – or try the vegan chocolate chip version for a healthy way to satisfy your sweet tooth!

Banana Baked Oatmeal

The original recipe (and suggestions for variations) are available here. (Thanks, Katie!)  Actually, Katie has a lot of other delicious, vegan amazing recipes using mostly whole foods on her blog.  Subscribe to her blog so you don’t miss any of her scrumptious posts!

What’s your favorite vegan weekend breakfast?

Vegan Cheeses in Egypt and We’re back!


Hi everybody! We missed you all!
We took a much-needed break, but are back and are looking forward to sharing lots of new recipes and goodies!

Recently, a reader asked about vegan cheese.  Cheese was one of the hardest animal products for us to stop eating – and I suppose that is true for most vegans.  But, in reality, it is just the fat and the salt we are enjoying.  So, can we find fatty, salty plant-based, compassionate alternatives in Egypt?  Well, yes, but….

None of the available options are solid, can be shredded, or melt. So, no – they won’t be good on a pizza, or work in a grilled cheese sandwich. However, there are some creamy, spreadable options that are tasty. In fact, there are several brand names available in the market (and a few more show up during the Christian fasting periods…)

Here are the versions we have bought, tried, and liked. We find them at Royal House, Alfa Market, Metro, and even some small groceries in neighborhoods have some!!!

The “white cheese” from Greenland:

“White Cheese” from Ahef – there are other flavors, too, including cheddar and blue cheese.

Prima’s olive-flavored cheese in a tub: (other flavors include pasterma and chili!)

Mobi’s “Smoked Cheese”:

Several of these cheeses use coconut oil or palm oil as a base.  Be careful!  These can be high in that “bad” kind of fat :).  Use them sparingly…

There are options for making homemade vegan cheeses, too.  However, some of the necessary ingredients are not directly available in Egypt. (We like to use nutritional yeast with cashews and agar powder…, none of which are available here : ( ! ) Once we find suitable recipes that will satisfy your CHEESY cravings with ingredients readily available in Egypt, we will share immediately!

Have you ever tried any of these products?  What’s your favorite?

Have you ever tried making homemade vegan cheese? What ingredients did you use?

Tuesday Teaser #4: Olive Lentil Burgers


Burgers!  There are so many varieties of vegan burgers out there!  But we happened upon this new version – using brown lentils (a FAVORITE of mine) and olives (a FAVORITE of Mary’s!).

When we first tried this recipe, we were really surprised at how easily the mix held together and how tasty it was!!!  The mix of mushrooms, olives, lentils and spices is just absolutely wonderful.

Although it takes a while to prepare, it is definitely worth the little extra time.  The first time I made this, we were able to make 8 burgers, but this time only 7.  That’s still enough for leftovers and sharing with friends!!!  We served ours with baked potatoes!!!

Check out the recipe here. Alf Hana!!!